Courses

Accepted Courses

Intro Courses

  • Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction

  Instructors: Jonathan Lazar, Simone Barbosa

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 09:30

This 3-unit course gives newcomers to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), practitioners without a formal education in HCI, and those teaching HCI for the first time, with an introduction and overview of the field. The course material is divided into seven sections: 1) HCI in a nutshell, 2) User-centered design (UCD) and gathering Requirements, 3) Theory-based HCI approaches, 4) Human cognition and HCI, 5) User diversity, 6) HCI design, and 7) HCI evaluation. Suggested reading lists will also be provided, for both audiences: practitioners without a formal education in HCI and those who will be teaching HCI for the first time.

 

Instructors: Duncan Brumby, Ann Blandford, Anna Cox, Sandy Gould, Paul Marshall

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Saturday 6th May 2017

Time: 09:30

This course will provide an introduction to methods used in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research. An equal focus will be given to both the quantitative and qualitative research traditions used to understand people and interactional contexts. We shall discuss these major research traditions along with their contemporary framings (e.g., in-the-wild research and Interaction Science). By the end of the course attendees will have a detailed understanding of how to select and apply methods to address a range of problems that are of concern to contemporary HCI researchers.

 

  • Introduction to Interface Accessibility

Instructors: Jonathan Lazar, Jon Gunderson, G. Anthony Giannoumis, Weiqin Chen

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 14:30

This two-unit course provides an overview of interface accessibility for people with disabilities. The course material is divided into three sections: 1) technical foundations of accessibility, 2) user-centered design methods for accessibility in systems development, and 3) research methods for involving people with disabilities in accessibility-related research. There are no prerequisites for this course, but the assumption is that participants will have a basic understanding of HCI concepts and a basic understanding of web programming.

 

  • Designing with the Mind in Mind: The Psychological Basis for UI Design Guidelines

Instructor: Jeff Johnson

Level: Intro/Intermediate - No prerequisite

Date: Monday 8th May 2017

Time: 14:30

UI design rules and guidelines are not simple recipes. Applying them effectively requires determining rule applicability and precedence and balancing trade-offs when rules compete. By understanding the underlying psychology, designers and evaluators enhance their ability to apply design rules. This two-part (160-minute) course explains that psychology.

 

Meta Courses

Instructor: Lennart Nacke

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Everything we do as researchers is based on what we write. This course is structured into two 80-minute units with a focus on (1) writing and (2) reviewing CHI papers: It provides hands-on advice on how to write papers with clarity, substance, and style. We will use online background materials to build a thorough understanding of the CHI paper structure and writing principles in the first unit of the course. In the second unit of the course, we will train how to structure reviews that are helpful and focused on enhancing someone’s research. Online material is available at: http://chicourse.acagamic.com.

 

  • Maker-Oriented Learning in Undergraduate HCI Courses

Instructors: Zane Cochran, Betsy DiSalvo

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 14:30

As the demand grows for active learning in undergraduate HCI courses, instructors must adapt their curriculum to provide applicable hands-on learning experiences for their students. This adaptation embodies a maker-oriented learning approach that embodies elements of the maker movement that can enrich an overall pedagogical approach to teaching HCI, as well as concrete activities that provide unique learning opportunities to students. In this course, we will present this maker-oriented learning approach in two sessions, focusing on how to adapt curriculum, as well as engaging participants in hands-on activities to demonstrate this approach.

 

  • Reflect, Re-claim, Reconnect: Learning to Say Yes Wisely and Strategically

Instructor: Geraldine Fitzpatrick

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Monday 8th May 2017

Time: 11:30

Many of us are overwhelmed with work pressures. One solution, we are often told, is to say ‘no’ more often. What this misses though is the importance of learning to say yes first to what is important. This course is for anyone wanting to make more strategic choices towards their version of a ‘good academic life’. Together we will 1) reflect on core values, what is important and what a good life means; 2) explore practical strategies to re-claim control over what we say yes and no to; and 3) reconnect to our best self through good self-care practices.

 

Instructor: Alan Dix

Level: Some previous use of stats or intro course in stats

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 14:30

Many find statistics confusing, and perhaps more so given recent publicity of problems with traditional p-values and alternative statistical techniques including confidence intervals and Bayesian statistics.  This course aims to help attendees navigate this morass: to understand the debates and more importantly make appropriate choices when designing and analysing experiments, empirical studies and other forms of quantitative data.  It is intended to fill the gap between the 'how to' knowledge in basic statistics courses and deep understanding.  You won't learn a hundred new statistical techniques, but you will find out what those you have heard of and use actually mean.

 

Methods Courses

  • Make This! Introduction to Electronics Prototyping Using Arduino

Instructors: David Sirkin, Nik Martelaro, Wendy Ju

Level: Intro - Prerequisite: familiarity with programming is helpful, but not required.

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 09:30

This course is a hands-on introduction to interactive electronics prototyping for people with a variety of backgrounds, including those with no prior experience in electronics. Familiarity with programming is helpful, but not required. Participants learn basic electronics, microcontroller programming and physical prototyping using the Arduino platform, then use digital and analog sensors, LED lights and motors to build, program and customize a small paper robot. The electronics and robot are theirs to keep.

 

  • User Story Mapping: The Hands-on Course

Instructors: Stephanie Foehrenbach, Christian Heldstab

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Want to keep the big picture during agile development? Get to know user story mapping! User story mapping provides a method and a visual representation, which helps keeping the big picture and a focus on the user and their tasks. The user story map is based on user’s journeys and links to the stories used for development. It thereby nicely builds a bridge between scenario oriented usability methods and the fragmentation of requirements into small building blocks applied in agile development practice. This course introduces user story mapping by multiple hands-on exercises.

 

  • Crowdsourcing and Crowd Work

Instructors: Jeffrey Bigham, Walter Lasecki, Chinmay Kulkarni

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Monday 8th May 2017

Time: 11:30

Crowdsourcing and human computation are useful in a number of real-world applications. Crowds generate large data sets useful for natural language processing and computer vision; they work together to formulate intelligent responses far beyond what we can automate;and they power intelligent interactive systems currently impossible with automated approaches alone. In this course, attendees will learn how to work with the crowd to enable research and practical applications. They will gain experience from the worker’s perspective, receive an introduction to writing programs that work with existing sources of crowds, (e.g., Amazon Mechanical Turk), apply usability principles for designing crowd tasks that elicit high-quality responses, use statistical methods to improve the quality of the work received, build systems that interface with crowd labor in real time, and conduct experiments to improve understanding of the differences between different sources of crowd work. The course will provide hands-on activities on each of these topics, and provide pointers to material that can provide more in depth information.

 

  • Sketching User Experiences: Hands-on Workshop of Sketching Techniques for HCI Research

Instructor: Nicolai Marquardt

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 11:30

Would you like to learn how to use sketching techniques for interaction design? In this hands-on course you will learn essential sketching strategies, apply these in practice during many hands-on exercises, and learn the various ways of using sketches as a tool when working on HCI projects. Techniques include: sketching vocabulary; rapid sketching of people, gestures, objects; photo tracing and hybrid sketches; wireframing; and storyboards. This course is open for everyone and does not require any previous experience in drawing. Its emphasis is on quick, easy to learn, and easy to apply methods for generating and refining ideas.

 

  • Practical UX Research Methodologies: Ethnography

Instructors: Sarah Garcia, Megan McCracken

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 09:30

The best way to understand how your users behave and live is to actually visit them in their homes or workplaces. Ethnographic research can seem overwhelming, but the principles are quite simple--it's being a humble observer in a user's personal space. Course participants will learn all about ethnographic research methodology and how to apply it effectively to their research. Tips will be given for structuring ethnographic visits to allow for useful discussion and observations. Attendees will learn how to make use of diaries and other interceptive methods to augment the ethnographic visits.

 

  • Computational Approaches to Interaction Design

Instructors: John Williamson, Antti Oulasvirta, Otmar Hilliges, Per Ola Kristensson

Level: Intermediate - Prerequisite: some familiarity with probability, linear algebra, Python/Jupyter would be useful.

Date: Monday 8th May 2017

Time: 11:30

This course introduces computational interaction design. Computational approaches are needed to rapidly synthesise interface arrangements, to learn interaction structure from observations, and infer user intentions from unreliable signals. The course will cover: Optimisation: solving interaction problems by automatically deriving interface configurations which satisfy constraints and maximise performance criteria. Inference: solving the problem of designing a transformation from input to useful action. By framing interaction as inferring intention we have a principled way to design robust interfaces.

 

  • UX Interviewing: Personalized Coaching to Avoid Leaving Data on the Table

Instructors: Elizabeth Baylor, Dawn Shaikh, Utkarsh Seth, Beverly Freeman, Marianne Berkovich, Martin Ortlieb

Level: Intermediate/Advanced - Prerequisite: prior experience of basic interviewing techniques

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Want to be a better moderator? Feel like you’re stuck in a rut with your current interviewing approach? Go beyond the basics of user interviews with personalized coaching that will enable you to create an individual action plan detailing your strengths, bad habits, and missed opportunities where you might be ‘leaving data on the table.’ You supply a non-confidential video of yourself moderating. We’ll take care of the rest - creating a safe, supportive environment where we can turn the analytical lens on ourselves as researchers and work together to investigate patterns in our existing practice.

 

Hot Topics

Instructor: m.c. schraefel

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 14:30

What do we need to know about our physical-social-visceral selves to design to support for human performance, from physical to cognitive? Where embodied interaction focuses on the person in the environment, treating the body as a kind of I/O black box, this course offers three easy-to-use models - blending kinesiology to neurology - to open that box, to help us access 1) how, what goes on inside us, in our "in-bodied selves", affects every aspect of our embodied performance & 2) how we can use these models to design and evaluate interactive systems to support human performance.

 

  • Designing Effective Privacy Notice and Consent Mechanisms

Instructors: Florian Schaub, Rebecca Balebako

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 16:30

Privacy notice and choice are essential aspects – and often requirements – of privacy and data protection regulation. Yet, today’s privacy notices and controls are often ineffective at informing users or allowing them to express choice. This course presents approaches for desiging privacy notices and controls that are more effective at helping users manage their privacy in technical systems. Participants learn to analyze challenges for privacy notice and controls in the context of complex technical systems, and learn to design suitable privacy interface and interaction solutions based on an understanding of the respective design space and best practices.

 

Instructors: Rafael Calvo, Dorian Peters

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Just as ergonomic design supports physical wellness, why aren’t we designing to support psychological wellness? By turning to well-established methods in psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral economics, we are now able to develop new technologies in a way that fosters psychological wellbeing -- an area of research and practice we’ve referred to as “positive computing”.  In this course we will introduce practical methods for evaluating and designing for wellbeing determinants like autonomy, competence, connectedness, meaning, and compassion. By integrating wellbeing-support into the technology design cycle, we move closer to a future in which all digital experience supports human flourishing.

 

  • Fundamentals of Gesture Production, Recognition, and Analysis

Instructor: Radu-Daniel Vatavu

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Monday 8th May 2017

Time: 11:30

This course will introduce practical aspects of human gesture production, gesture recognition, and gesture analysis. Techniques will be exemplified with data analysis and software tools readily available to download and use. Participants will be able to try out gesture analysis on their own computers. Familiarity with gesture user interfaces is not required. It is my hope that this course will effect into a valuable source of information for researchers and practitioners entering the gesture interaction field interested in prototyping novel, highly-interactive systems controllable by means of human gestures.

 

  • An Introduction to Automotive User Interfaces

Instructors: Bastian Pfleging, Nora Broy, Andrew Kun

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Wednesday 10th May 2017

Time: 14:30

The objective of this course is to provide newcomers to Automotive User Interfaces with an introduction and overview of the field. The course will introduce the specifics and challenges of In-Vehicle User Interfaces that set this field apart from others. We will provide an overview of the specific requirements of Automotive UI, discuss the design of such interfaces, also with regard to standards and guidelines. We further outline how to evaluate interfaces in the car, discuss the challenges with upcoming automated driving and present trends and challenges in this domain.

 

Instructors: Philippe Palanque, Camille Fayollas, Célia Martinie

Level: Intro - No prerequisite

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 09:30

This course takes a practical approach to introduce the principles, methods and tools in tasks modelling and how this technique can support identification of automation opportunities, dangers and limitations. A technical interactive hands-on exercise of how to "do it right", such as: How to go from task analysis to task models? How to identify tasks that are good candidate for automation (through analysis and simulation)? How to identify reliability and usability dangers added by automation? How to design usable automations at system, application and interaction levels? And more ... including legal issues raised by autonomous systems.

 

Instructors: Theresa-Marie Rhyne

Level: Intro - You must have a smartphone for examining apps

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 09:30

We examine the foundations of color theory & how these methods apply to building effective digital media. We define color harmony & demonstrate the application of color harmony to case studies. Case studies include historic & new infographics as well as time series animations. The Pantone Matching System, Munsell Color System and other hue systems are reviewed. The features of ColorBrewer,Adobe’s Capture CC app, Josef Albers “Interaction of Color” app and other tools are examined. This includes evaluations of color deficiencies. Please bring small JPEG examples of your digital media content for performing color analyses during the hands on session.

 

Instructors: Jeremy Frey, Camille Jeunet, Jelena Mladenovic, Léa Pillette, Fabien Lotte

Level: Intro/Intermediate - No prerequisite

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) bring promising interaction perspectives. First, active BCIs enable users to control applications (e.g., assistive technologies or video games) using brain activity alone. Second, passive BCIs can adapt an application based on users’ mental states. In this course, we first aim at introducing BCIs to the HCI community and to discuss how BCI could benefit HCI. Then, in a practical session, we will propose all participants to implement their own BCI, in an easy way, using the free OpenViBE software. Finally, we will discuss about what is possible or not with BCIs, what are their pros and cons.

 

Instructors: Cosmin Munteanu, Roisin McNaney

Level: Intro/Intermediate - Prerequisite: basic familiarity of research with human participants

Date: Thursday 11th May 2017

Time: 14:30

In this tutorial we present the key principles that guide research with human participants, and how these apply to field studies of interactive technologies. This is largely based on existing policies that have been adopted nationally in some places or specific to certain disciplines or professional associations. We discuss the gaps that exist between these guidelines and the challenges of conducting fieldwork of interactive technologies, particularly in sensitive or difficult environments. These are exemplified by cases studies of ours and our colleagues' recent research. We conclude with a facilitated discussion of examples brought forward by the audience.

 

Instructors: Cosmin Munteanu, Gerald Penn

Level: Intro/Intermediate - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 09:30

Speech remains HCI's "holy grail", yet it is the most difficult modality to be understood by machines -- its processing resulting in error rates of high variability, especially under adverse conditions. The aim of this course is to inform the HCI community of the current state of speech and natural language research, to dispel some of the myths surrounding speech-based interaction, as well as to provide an opportunity for HCI researchers and practitioners to learn more about how speech recognition and synthesis work, what are their limitations, and how these could be used to enhance current interaction paradigms.

 

Instructors: Gustavo Tondello, Lennart Nacke

Level: Intro/Intermediate - No prerequisite

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 14:30

To evaluate gamified apps, we have developed a new set of guidelines for heuristic evaluation of gameful design in interactive systems. Our set of 28 gamification heuristics allows rapid evaluation of a gameful system. This course will teach attendees how to use our gameful design heuristics and train using the heuristics on an example application. Our course is structured into two 80-minute units, which gives the participants enough time to learn the new heuristics, get supervised when using an onboarding exercise and apply them to a gamified application. At the end, we will generate design ideas with the heuristics.

 

  • Creative Worthwhile Interaction Design

Instructor: Gilbert Cockton

Level: Intermediate/Advanced - Prerequisite: ideally experience of some design/development projects from initiation to completion

Date: Tuesday 9th May 2017

Time: 09:30

More is now expected from Interaction Design, but change can be challenging. Over the last two decades, creative and strategic design approaches have become increasingly prevalent, but tensions exist with longer established approaches such as human factors engineering and user-centered design. These tensions can be harnessed productively by giving equal status in principle to creative, business and engineering practices and by adopting approaches and resources that can balance and integrate a range of multidisciplinary design practices. This hands-on course will show you how to balance and integrate interaction design work, supported by theory from design, psychology, business and media.

 

Quick Facts

Important Dates

  • Submission Deadline: Wed 12 October 2016 (20:00 EDT)
  • Notification: Wed 23 November 2016
  • Revised Course Description: Wed 7 December 2016
  • Electronic Course Notes: Wed 15 March 2017
  • Room/Material Requirements: Mon 3 April 2017

 

Course Suggestion? Tell us: Request/Suggest a Course

 

Hot Topics: Example hot topics include: advanced stats, prototyping, VR/AR,  physical data, machine learning, and more. See below for a full list.

 

Formal Submission Details

  • Online Submission: PCS Submission System
  • Template: Extended Abstracts Format
  • Submission Format: 300 word advanced program description, detailed course description, and sample course material
  • New for CHI2017: priority will be given to courses with clear practical content and skills-based takeaway value

 

Selection Process: Curated

 

Chairs: Erik Andersen, Max L. Wilson, and Hilary Hutchinson  (courses@chi2017.acm.org)

 

At the Conference: Accepted Courses are usually taught in up to three 80-minute sessions during the conference. Course instructors typically receive 1 free registration (or optionally an honorarium) per session taught.

 

Archives: Course descriptions will be published in the Extended Abstracts; ACM Digital Library

 

What is a CHI Course?

Courses allow CHI attendees to extend their knowledge beyond their current area(s) of expertise. Courses help people to 1) explore new methods, techniques, and practices, 2) develop new skills in order to innovate, and 3) become inspired to pursue new ideas. Participants will include industry managers and professionals, practitioners, students and researchers. Courses will be offered in up to three 80-minute sessions. Courses will run in parallel with the technical program. Courses can be designed for novices, experts, or audiences with general interest – the expected audience should be very clear in the proposal.

 

For example, a Course could:

  • Introduce practitioners to emerging areas, new technologies and methods within HCI research
  • Create opportunities to learn new techniques for use in research or practice
  • Provide master level classes for experienced CHI attendees
  • Provide advanced instruction in CHI-related tools, technologies or methods
  • Provide a substantial overview of state-of-the-art research or technology areas
  • Provide HCI meta-skills, such as being an AC, writing papers and grant proposals, making research videos, giving presentations, etc.

 

Courses are different to Workshops – Workshops are meetings of experts exploring new knowledge. Courses are expert instructors, typically with established reputations, teaching people new to a topic. See Courses vs Workshops for more information.

 

Message from the CHI 2017 Courses Chairs

We expect courses to provide clear practical value to intended audiences (researchers, practitioners, designers, developers, managers, and students), and at recommended levels: new researchers, general interest, or experts.

 

In line with the conference theme of "do good," we encourage proposals for CHI 2017 conference courses that cover topics like:

  • Professional courses focusing on all stages of the user-centered development cycle including user needs and requirements analysis, design, prototyping and evaluation
  • Practical and technical methods that are relevant to HCI (e.g., storyboarding, role playing and improvisation methods, prototyping tools and methods, experimental design and analysis, statistical methods, field methods, Web design tools and languages, mobile development frameworks, microelectronics toolkits, gesture and sensor toolkits, robot programming toolkits)
  • New and emerging topics within and/or relevant to HCI (e.g., HCI and the home, sustainability, mobile HCI, developments in automotive technologies, social media design, game design)
  • Historical courses about the foundations of HCI

 

If you want to discuss your ideas for courses with us, then just ping us.

 

Erik Andersen, Cornell University, USA

Max L. Wilson, University of Nottingham, UK

Hilary Hutchinson, Google

courses@chi2017.acm.org

 

Hot Topics & Course Suggestions

Our goal is to provide courses with high relevance and educational value to the CHI community. Although any course proposals are welcome, the following have been requested and labelled as hot topics.

  • Advanced statistics for HCI
  • Practical prototyping / sketching
  • Virtual & Augmented Reality (practical focus)
  • Arduino / hardware
  • Home fabrication
  • Play & Games
  • UX (from established practitioners)
  • Brain-Computer Interaction & physiological data
  • Visual analytics scientific data
  • Art+HCI
  • Data science / big data / machine learning
  • Accessible interfaces & inclusive design
  • Cognitive science / memory / information processing
  • Healthcare
  • Internet of Things
  • Tangible interaction
  • Human-Robot Interaction
  • Crowdsourcing and Crowdwork
  • Automotive User Interfaces
  • Privacy & Security

 

Student Courses: writing papers, reviewing, ACing, networking, presenting, making research videos, recruiting participants, etc.

 

Early Faculty Courses: writing proposals, hiring students, networking, converting research to impact.

 

If you have ideas for courses you would like to see presented at CHI 2017, or in the future, please provide course suggestions using the link below.

 

Tell us about it: Request/Suggest a Course for CHI2017

 

The link above is NOT for submitting your Course to CHI2017. See below for how to Submit a Course to CHI2017.

 

Preparing and Submitting your CHI Course Proposal

A Course proposal must be submitted via the PCS Submission System by 12 October 2016, 20:00 EDT. The proposal should have the following components:

  1. Advance Program Description (300 words)
  2. Course Description (up to 4 pages)
  3. (optional) Course Material Samples (for example, handouts, slides, etc.)

 

As part of the online submission process, submitters will be asked to also provide the following to help the jury and chairs understand the logistical constraints of the proposed course:

  • Duration of the Course (total number of 80-minute sessions).
  • Linkage to other courses, if any. A linkage should be defined if there is a dependency between the courses requiring that they be considered together. Linked courses will be accepted or rejected together. Include scheduling constraints, such as the order of the Courses and whether they can be scheduled on different days.
  • Audience size: what is the preferred audience size? The average number of registrations for Courses at CHI in recent years was 43 (st.dev.=18), with 10 of the 28 Courses having over 50 registrations. If the Course is very popular, would you consider teaching it more than once? We will contact instructors of Courses that have significant enrollments by the end of the second week of registration. If you believe your course should be limited to a certain number for optimal effect, please state so and state the optimal number below or above which you believe your course would not be maximally effective.
  • Course history: if the proposed Course has been given previously, describe where it was given, the evaluation it received from attendees, and how it will be modified.
  • Student Volunteers: specify and justify student volunteer help for your Course.
  • Audio/visual needs: CHI can generally provide a projector, screen, computer audio, and podium microphone. Budget constraints make it unlikely that additional equipment can be provided. CHI also provides a small budget for instructors to buy office supplies for their course. Please define all your requirements for audio visual aids and office supplies.
  • Promotional strategy: a description of your advertising/promotional strategy for attracting attendees

 

Part 1. Advance Program Description

The Advance Program Description is a brief 300-word abstract that is used to describe and advertise your course to prospective attendees. The description should describe the topic to be covered with pointers to relevant background material, an outline of the course activities itself and short presenter/tutor bios.

 

Part 2. Detailed Course Description (up to 4 pages)

The Course description is the most important part of your proposal. The jury will evaluate the course based primarily on this description and the material sample in Part 3. The course descriptions for accepted courses will be included in the 2017 CHI Extended Abstracts. This part of the proposal must not exceed four pages. It should include:

  • Title of the Course (please make this short but descriptive)
  • Names and affiliations of the instructors.
  • Benefits: summarize the learning outcomes (skills and knowledge) the attendees will gain as a result of attending this Course. This should include the reasons that CHI attendees would want to take your course.
  • Intended Audience(s): types of audience (researchers, students, practitioners, etc) that will benefit from the course
  • Prerequisites: describe any background required to understand the Course, including attendance at any other course in the program if that is a requirement.
  • Content: describe in detail the material that will be covered, and in what format (demo, lecture, discussions, etc).
  • Practical work: describe the expected practical work in the course.
  • Instructor background: list the background for each instructor, including current employment and activities, previous professional activities, and relevant publications.
  • Resources: web site or other resources (e.g., books) that might be accessed to provide more information about the Course or instructor(s)

 

Part 3. Course Material Sample (optional)

Provide a sample of the Course material you will present in this Course. This can include handouts, slides or other relevant material you plan to use or have used before in courses, talks or related curriculum.

 

Course Selection Process

CHI 2017 Courses will be curated by the CHI 2017 Course Chairs. Acceptance of proposals will be based on:

  1. Fit within the overall CHI education curriculum, that balances topics over consecutive years as well as relationship to the theme of this year's conference, overall distribution of topics within this year's program, approaches, audience experience levels, and specialties of the intended audience.
  2. Practical activities and value for the participants.
  3. Factors such as relevance of the course to HCI, the value provided to the intended audience, suitability for presentation given venue and time constraints, timeliness of topic, attendance limits and presentation methods.
  4. Previous presentations and, if appropriate, course participant evaluations of the Course at CHI and number of times this course (or a similar course or tutorial) has been offered over the past years.
  5. Prior experience and qualifications of the instructors.

 

Courses should not contain sensitive, private, or proprietary information that cannot be disclosed at publication time.  Courses that promote products (solely for marketing purposes) will not be considered. The courses may discuss techniques or products in the context of larger issues. Submissions should NOT be anonymous. However, confidentiality of submissions will be maintained during the jury process. All rejected submissions will be kept confidential in perpetuity.

 

Upon Acceptance of your CHI Course

Course instructors will be notified of acceptance or non-acceptance by 23 November, 2016. The instructors will receive more information about the expected format of the Course notes and about logistics (e.g., student volunteers, A/V equipment, recommendations and requirements for course evaluations, course payments) after acceptance of courses. Course instructors typically receive 1 free registration (or optionally an honorarium) per session taught.

 

As a general guideline, Course notes are intended to provide the attendees with carry-away materials that will enable them to concentrate their attention on the presentation and participation, rather than on hastily taking handwritten notes.

 

As with recent years, the course notes will primarily be distributed online, in digital format. A few paper copies of the digital notes will be available for sale at Registration, but we intend for most attendees to view these on their computers or phones as html or pdf files.

 

The notes should include materials such as:

  • Introduction
  • Copies of presentation material, e.g., slides
  • Annotated bibliography and/or recommended reading
  • Copies of relevant background material or scholarly papers (for which the instructors have obtained any necessary reprint permission)
  • Course exercises, as appropriate

 

Instructors will be required to sign a release form giving CHI one-time-only permission to utilize the notes for course participants and to sell notes at the conference. All accepted courses are required to provide their course notes to CHI 2017. The deadline for the course notes is 22 February 2017.

 

Cancellation: Courses with fewer than 10 participants registered by the early registration deadline may be cancelled. We therefore strongly recommend that you promote your courses through social media channels, in your own social networks, to your personal contacts and in your teaching, research and professional/practice communities. The CHI 2017 conference organizers will not promote specific courses or course materials.

 

At the Conference

Your CHI Course will be allotted up to three 80-minute sessions for presentation. We will coordinate A/V requirements with accepted course instructors. Instructors should see Presenting at CHI 2017 for information about standard computing and A/V equipment that will be made available to instructors and presenters at CHI 2017.

 

After the Conference

Accepted four-page Course Descriptions will be distributed in the CHI Extended Abstracts, available on USB and in the ACM Digital Library. Course notes and additional descriptive material will not be available in the Proceedings or the ACM Digital Library.

 

 

 

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